Tears in the Fence celebrates its 50th issue in style

Blog / Tom Chivers

Tears in the Fence, the international literary magazine edited since 1984 by Dorset-based poet and critic David Caddy (below), is celebrating 50 issues this year with a bumper new edition and a jam-packed launch event in London’s East End.       This bumper anniversary edition is a literary feast that cuts across generations and continents, […]

Tears in the Fence, the international literary magazine edited since 1984 by Dorset-based poet and critic David Caddy (below), is celebrating 50 issues this year with a bumper new edition and a jam-packed launch event in London’s East End.
  


  

This bumper anniversary edition is a literary feast that cuts across generations and continents, featuring writers from America, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ghana, New Zealand, South Africa, Trinidad and the UK. Highlights include cult London author Iain Sinclair, multi-award winning New York poet Edward Field, ethnopoet and anthropologist Nathaniel Tarn, acclaimed American writer Sheila E Murphy, and the poet whom Charles Bukowski dubbed ‘America’s greatest undiscovered talent’, Gerald Locklin.
  
Tears in the Fence is a major supporter of new talent and this issue is no exception, showcasing a vibrant new generation of young British poets including Melanie Challenger, Luke Kennard and Chris McCabe. Major avant-garde poets Lee Harwood, John James and Peter Riley also feature. As well as new poetry and prose, Tears in the Fence is home to high-quality critical writing. Essays in this issue tackle commercialism in literature, new nature poetry and the state of women’s writing.
  
To celebrate 50 issues of Tears in the Fence, traditional East End boozer The Bell, near Liverpool Street, will play host to an afternoon of readings on Saturday 5th September. This free event kicks off at 3pm until 8pm and is held in association with Penned in the Margins.

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